Remember the FAT FREE hype? – Would you believe that was a government conspiracy theory to propel SUGAR industry profits $$$$

If you remove the fat you have to replace it with something else to give it flavor … how bout SUGAR …  this would then drive “America’s per capita sugar consumption up by a third. “ if not more and support the sugar industry.

sugarmountainpicJust after I posted last week’s blog my friend and colleague Lewis sent me this. I’m posting it for you in its entirety because I feel it’s worth the read and think you should know.

50 Years Ago, Sugar Industry Quietly Paid Scientists To Point Blame At Fat: NPR

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The article draws on internal documents to show that an industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation wanted to “refute” concerns about sugar’s role in heart disease. The SRF then sponsored research by Harvard scientists that did just that. The result was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1967, with no disclosure of the sugar industry funding.

The sugar-funded research was a literature review, examining a variety of studies and experiments. It was delayed, according to the newly uncovered documents, because more and more studies raising concerns about sugar were being published even as the scientists were working on their rebuttals.

The authors of the new study say that for the past five decades, the sugar industry has been attempting to influence the scientific debate over the relative risks of sugar and fat.

“It was a very smart thing the sugar industry did, because review papers, especially if you get them published in a very prominent journal, tend to shape the overall scientific discussion,” article co-author Stanton Glantz told the New York Times.

The SRF was clear that its “particular interest” was in evaluating studies of sugar. And it was certainly happy with the result: “Let me assure you this is quite what we had in mind and we look forward to its appearance in print,” John Hickson, SRF vice president and director of research, told one of the scientists.

The scientists had raised concerns about the validity of research that suggested sugar could play a role in coronary heart disease, concluded that reducing fat consumption was undoubtedly the best way to reduce coronary heart disease.

“It is always appropriate to question the validity of individual studies,” lead author Cristin Kearns told Bloomberg via email. But, she says, “the authors applied a different standard” to different studies — looking very critically at research that implicated sugar, and ignoring problems with studies that found dangers in fat.

The documents in question are five decades old, but the larger issue is of the moment, as Marion Nestle notes in a commentary in the same issue of JAMA Internal Medicine:

“This 50-year-old incident may seem like ancient history, but it is quite relevant, not least because it answers some questions germane to our current era. Is it really true that food companies deliberately set out to manipulate research in their favor? Yes, it is, and the practice continues. In 2015, the New York Times obtained emails revealing Coca-Cola’s cozy relationships with sponsored researchers who were conducting studies aimed at minimizing the effects of sugary drinks on obesity. Even more recently, the Associated Press obtained emails showing how a candy trade association funded and influenced studies to show that children who eat sweets have healthier body weights than those who do not.”

Here is the article in it’s entirety:

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/09/13/493739074/50-years-ago-sugar-industry-quietly-paid-scientists-to-point-blame-at-fat?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20160913&utm_campaign=news&utm_term=nprnews

Keep this in mind when reading your food labels:

4 grams of sugar = 1 teaspoon

No es Bueno : (

GO for Life! ™contact

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

Still on CRACK- How much Sugar Should We Consume?

In case you’re wondering…

The American Heart Association’s recommended daily allowance of sugar:

spoonful of sugar

•3 teaspoons of added sugar for children

•6 teaspoons of added sugar for women

•9 teaspoons of added sugar for men

If you consider a can of coke or glass of orange juice can contain around nine teaspoons, then take into account all the hidden sugars in our food… That’s above and beyond : O

 JUST SO YOU KNOW
The average American consumes about 152 pounds of sugar a year. That’s roughly 22 teaspoons every day for every person in America. To make matters worse, kids consume about 34 teaspoons every day — that’s more than two 20-ounce sodas — making nearly one in four teenagers pre-diabetic or diabetic.

THE REAL SKINNY
Even though the American Heart Association has a recommended daily allowance, ” the REAL SKINNY is that just a spoonful of sugar will set you in a tailwind spiral downward into the abyss of addiction of the worst kind and beyond.”jb

It’s no wonder America’s health is doomed and health care makes a fortune.

We have been sabotaged : /

Don’t be a victim, take control of your own health people.

GO for Life! ™contact

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

Sugar by Any Other Name Is STILL Sugar – BEWARE

Spotting Sugar when it’s masked by other names on Nutrition labels can be somewhat tricky if you don’t know what you are looking for.

sugar lips

 

 

 

 

 

Below is a quick guide of sugar nicknames to look out for:

    • Agave nectar
    • Evaporated cane juice
    • Malt syrup
    • Brown sugar
    • Fructose
    • Maple syrup
    • Cane crystals
    • Fruit juice concentrates
    • Molasses
    • Cane sugar
    • Glucose
    • Raw sugar
    • Corn sweetener
    • High-fructose corn syrup
    • Sucrose
    • Sorbitol
    • Xylotol
    • Corn syrup
    • HoneySyrup
    • Crystalline fructose
    • Invert sugar
    • Dextrose
    • Maltose

Beware of the hidden sugars lurking in food labels.

GO for Life! ™jefitthumb2

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

Get Off the Crack and Get Back on Track – SUGAR is a Bad Habit

SugarpicIt’s been a while since I’ve been on the subject of nutrition, almost as long as my recovery.  Don’t think that hasn’t been in the forefront while I’ve been recovering. In fact, what has enabled me to continue to recover as quickly is being mindful of my nutrition.  I will admit though I’ve not been perfect and probably caved in to more cheat days then I normally would give in to.. But hey, sometimes I am human.  So now that I am getting stronger on my track it’s time to reckon with those demons and banish them off the track.

Sugar does to your brain — the exact same thing smoking, alcohol and cocaine do.

Studies show that Lab rats prefer sugar to cocaine. When given the choice between sugar, cocaine and alcohol those cross-addicted rats always choose sugar.

Eating high-sugar foods lights up your brain on an MRI like a Christmas tree. The very same part of the brain that’s triggered by cocaine or heroine according to research by Dr. David Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D.

The dopamine receptors are activated in the brain when sugar is consumed, and the more sugar that is ingested the more desensitized the brain becomes to the dopamine response and the more sugar is needed to maintain that high.

When the brain starts reducing its number of dopamine receptors in order to keep things balanced “downregulation” is the reason we develop a tolerance.

From there it’s a downward spiral…

Eating wheat, flour and sugar in processed foods spikes our sugar, then insulin. These are the hormonal disturbances that make you store belly fat, and then you are hungry for more sweets and starchy junk food and the cycle continues from there.

Sugar increases your insulin levels, which can lead to:

•OBESITY

•DIABETES

•HEART DISEASE

•IMPAIR BRAIN FUNCTION

•HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND HIGH CHOLESTEROL

•PREMATURE AGING

Controlling your insulin levels is one of the most important things you can do to optimize your overall health, and avoiding sugar is the key.

Bottom line, there is no fundamental difference between junk food addiction and drug addiction and basically, Oreos are legal crack. : /

GO for Life! ™jefitthumb2

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer