VI: Getting Back on Track with Unstable Surface Training for Greater Stability

ropes bosuLike the name implies, unstable surface training is when you perform resistance or bodyweight training with all or part of you acting against a surface that it self is unstable. Stable surface training, is when you are simply standing on the ground or sitting on a regular bench or any surface that is stable.

Your core in general serves to protect your spine and prevent major injury and paralysis. When working on an unstable surface you’re always working on your core.pistol squats

Simulating an unstable surface environment in a controlled setting creates a shaking reaction. That shaking or balance reaction stimulates proprioceptors. Proprioceptors are position sensors in your joints.  This can improve sensory function, meaning that the central nervous system receives better feedback to improve the motor signals it sends out, Thus strengthening your joints and improving joint health.

bosu balanceFrom a neurological standpoint your body understands that if you improve joint health your ready for more tensile strength or more force to go through each and every joint in your body which means you can utilize more muscles on all sides of your joints to be able to recruit and co-contract to create a better more stable joint.bosu lunge

Joints connect bones and its primary function is to provide motion and flexibility to the frame of the body.  A strong joint provides stability for the overall framework of your body in motion.

By strengthening that signal, this allows for better coordination to send a more direct signal to get a stronger contraction and tell your body that it has the stability to protect you.

bosu pushupsSome great tools to incorporate into your rehab or workout are: Bosu balls (my favorite), stability balls, dyna discs and medicine balls.  Really you can create your own unstable surfaces to challenge yourself.

Also, the faster you go the harder the unstable surface gets, the more challenging it becomes to your joints and stabilizers.

Surge on!

DO WHAT YOU CAN WHILE YOU CAN’T DO!

GO for Life! ™jefitthumb2

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

II: Getting Back on the Track, The Journey Continues – Proceed With Caution

Thank you to Everyone who reached out with messages after my post a couple of weeks ago  … for sharing your honest journey with me and thank you for being a part in mine and making me feel like you’re holding my hand.. It helps :)

Doc says I can start swimming. PT has me on the Anti-Gravity Treadmill to simulate running. LOOK I am moving forward…

AlterG

It’s been almost 5 months since my second surgery though it does feel like a year and 4 all lumped into one. That said I intuitively picked month 4 as the turning point when things would start to seem less challenging rather than the uphill battle I feel I’ve been fighting.  The weight would magically start to disappear from around my hips and thighs. That bloated feeling would begin to wither away.  My clothes would start to fit more like it should and I would start to look and feel more like myself again.

As can be expected, I still have limitations and staying within them is like coloring inside the lines. Even though I feel better there are still warning signs reminding me to proceed with caution.

My current challenge is finding the balance between doing and not doing too much.  Allowing my body to continue healing while I continue to strengthen and start integrating functional movement.

Moving forward cautiously…

DO WHAT YOU CAN WHILE YOU CAN’T DO!

GO for Life! ™contact

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer