IV: Getting Back on The Track still – Achieving Balance and Single-Limb Training

This is a reoccurring theme.. Maybe it’s because it is so difficult to achieve and maintain.  At least for the time being this theme keeps coming up for me in my recovery.  It’s like two steps forward one step back.. Just as I begin to think I’m done with this recovery thing something pulls me back to let me know that I’m still in it.

SL stepupThe imbalance between the right and left side is persistant at making me notice that I still have work to do.

Six months out now and feeling frustrated … more than slightly.  Just the other day I decided to test my body.  I tried a light jog only to wake up 2 days later and find my neck stiff as a board and couldn’t turn it.

Thankfully nothing that a chiropractic adjustment couldn’t fix but still a reminder that there’s more work to be done before I’m free.

These imbalances between right and left occur more often than you think.  If you get used to doing things always with your dominant side and never train the other side, over time  you are more than likely to develop an imbalance. You may not notice it for years to come but prepare yourself because when it does hit you will feel the pain in all areas that will be trying to overcompensate for your weakness. You’ll be dumbfounded wondering what hit you.

SO how to correct these imbalances or prevent them before they get you?

SINGLE LIMB TRAINING

Single-Limb training corrects left-right strength and size asymmetries and improves general balance and proprioception different from the way heavy resistance training does.

SL deadliftAnother method I implement is adding one extra set on the right.  So basically I start and finish with the right side for 4 sets on the right and 3 on the left, in an attempt to correct the weakness on my surgical side and bring it up to par with the left.

Here are some examples of exercises you can incorporate into your workout:

•Single-leg deadlift

•Single-leg squats

•Balance lunges SL Balance lunge

•Strict step-ups

•Single-leg hops

•Single leg calf raises

These provide the smallest possible base of support and require the greatest proprioceptive response. An excellent tool for developing stability, balance and strength interdependently of each other.

Though it takes twice as long to train each leg individually as it would to train them both at the same time this can serve as a bonus to increase your metabolic conditioning which means you can burn more fat  : )

Well at least with the two step forward and one step back method I’m still moving forward :)

Hit me up for more exercises.

DO WHAT YOU CAN WHILE YOU CAN’T DO!

GO for Life! ™joycethumb

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

 

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