On the Road to Recovery II- Keeping the Strength at your Core (video post inside)

While I’m still in the transition phase from non-weight bearing to weight bearing, core strengthening and pilates is helping me to rebalance my entire system as I reintegrate myself.

Since exercise progression begins from a supported position Pilates is a great tool to assist me in going from 5 weeks of non–weight bearing to weight bearing, to open chain and later progressing to explosive movements…I’m not there yet.

By aligning my skeletal system, and strengthening my core, I am able to stabilize and move easier by alleviating excess stress on peripheral joints and other areas while I heal.

My limitation here is not to use my glutes and abductors, (butt and outer thighs) So I work around them to keep everything else strong while the affected area heals.  I also keep blood circulating and focus on breathing, this in turn will help speed my recovery.

Pilates promotes an even musculature throughout the body by stabilizing muscles around the joints. It also stresses spinal and pelvic alignment. The focus is on active lengthening of muscles and mobility of the joints, rather than traditional prolonged static stretching. All of which is critical in getting us to move the way we’re supposed to move to avoid injury, facilitate recovery and improve athletic performance.

The core is considered the “center” of the body and consists of the deep abdominal muscles along with the muscles closest to the spine. Recruiting this system helps to facilitate pelvic stability, muscle balancing, neuromuscular coordination, biomechanical efficiency, increased proprioceptive awareness and increased muscle-firing patterns as well as muscle activation.

A strong core provides a dynamic link between the upper and lower body.  By including stabilizing and strengthening moves at varying angles and ranges of motion it trains the neuromuscular firing patterns, musculoskeletal and fascial systems to work together more effectively and efficiently.

Gratefully, my friend and Pilates instructor, who owns Nomi Pilates has been helping me with this transitory phase.  Naomi Weyrowski thinks that “Pilates is a safe and effective workout to continue strengthening and stretching to help recover and also begin to hone in on having “conscious competence’ and begin to see the imbalances and weaknesses and misalignments in your own body and work to correct these faulty movement patterns.”

Naomi also thinks that with the Pilates principles, breath, movement, flow, precision and control, not only will it help speed recovery but puts one on to the path to overall awareness and quality of movement to prevent injuries in the future.

What I have found, is that the longer it takes to heal, the weaker you get, the harder and longer the recovery will take a toll physically, mentally and emotionally. By going into the surgery strong, maintaining and fortifying what I can keep strong, will help the recovery process to be easier and seem shorter.

Coming out of a prior surgery with a one-year recovery, I have another 6-month recovery ahead of me.  My biggest challenge… staying as strong and as positive as I can on the road to recovery.

Keep moving people and

DO WHAT YOU CAN WHILE YOU CAN’T DO!

GO for Life! ™

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

 

ref article: http://physical-therapy.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/Pilates-for-Injury-Recovery.aspx

The Road to Recovery – Do What You Can When You Can’t DO (workout video inside)

Over the years I can’t even tell you, pardon my being so blunt, the number of dumb excuses I’ve heard why people can’t workout.

You’ve been sidelined by injury, illness or limitations, the road to recovery can be long arduous, boring and depressing but you can make it easier for yourself by staying active and  keeping the rest of you strong.

People are always asking me to post workouts videos and my feelings were, there are so many already out there, why post another one when you can google any exercise you want to see.

I found no reason to post and share until NOW

My restriction is non weight bearing lower body for 4 weeks.  That seemed impossible to someone like me.  Here I post my first upper body circuit workout 2 weeks post op after my 2nd hip surgery this year : o

My point is this, there is plenty you CAN DO while you are recovering from an injury, a surgery or any thing that creates limitations for you, the trick is to work around it!

Do what you can to stay strong while the rest of you mends.  Keep moving what you can and get the blood circulating.  The stronger you are the faster you will heal : ) This will cut your recovery time make it that much easier to get back to where you were and stay in shape while you recover.

NO MORE EXCUSES PEOPLE!

Keep Moving

GO for Life! ™whoefoodscrutches

In peace, health & with much love,

 

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

HIIT Cardio for Intense Fat Burning

heart rate watchHigh Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) gets and keeps your heart rate up and burns more fat in less time.

In this type of training  you give one hundred percent all-out effort through quick, intense bursts of exercise, followed by short, sometimes active, recovery periods.  Because This gets and keeps your heart rate up it burns more fat in less time.

By taxing both the anaerobic and aerobic systems you are able to increase your endurance while improving your conditioning level, improve glucose metabolism and burn more fat.

HIIT increases the resting metabolic rate  (RMR) for the following 24 hours due to excess post-exercise oxygen consumption , and may improve maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) more effectively than doing only traditional, long aerobic workouts.

However, HIIT is not an everyday activity!

Repeat

DO NOT try this everyday.. it WILL lead to overtraining, injuries and metabolic disorders and this will lead you nowhere fast!

Because the central nervous system (CNS) is primarily affected by this high-intensity work it takes a minimum of 48 hours to recover.

HIIT sessions may vary from 4–30 minutes. These sessions are short but intense.

HIIT Cardio sessions can be performed on a bike, elliptical, treadmill running, or even on stairs.

For example 20 sec intensive work 10 sec rest – repeat 4 minutes, also known as Tabata Training.

Training intervals once/week can improve body composition along with conditioning levels.  To improve your conditioning levels aim for 2 x week.

This type of training puts serious demands on the body and should leave you physically and mentally drained after a good workout.

Recovery antidote for this is old fashioned steady state cardio training : )

Use slow fat burning cardio at about 120 bpm the other 4-5 days/week to recover and continue burning fat : ).

*HIIT Training can be incorporated into your routine only after you have safely built an aerobic baseline.

More on this soon…
Heart Rate Monitor ( No Chest Strap)

With Chest Strap

GO for Life! ™contact

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal

Your Adrenals & Stress- DONT’s

Joycelyn-326web 2_WMAdrenal Fatigue is usually caused by some form of stress.  No matter physical, emotional, psychological, environmental or infectious, your adrenals respond to every kind of stress in the same manner.

Even if minor, stressors accumulate and the adrenals have no opportunity to FULLY recover.

Adrenal Fatigue takes patience to overcome.

Recovery can take 3 months to 2 years depending on the severity.

Discipline is required to making lifestyle changes to reduce stress.

Make a conscious effort to avoid these things:

Getting overtired

Caffeine

Sugar

Alcohol

White flour products

Coffee (this was hard)

Staying up past 11pm

Pushing yourself

Energy suckers

Being Harsh or negative with yourself

Feeling sorry for yourself

Food allergies & sensitivities

Never skip breakfast

Competition

OVER TRAINING (this was my pitfall)

These appear difficult or even crazy, but these may keep your body from healing.

Give the body a chance to heal.  It really is a small price to pay for the quality and the longevity of your life.

GO for Life! ™

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

Injured, Fatigued, Stressed or Depressed is this YOU

Joycelyn-326web 2_WMWhen we get frightened or excited our “fight or flight” glands or ADRENAL GLANDS  produce adrenaline which turbo-charges our muscles to move. Despite their size, these organs are very busy regulating many reactions in the body.

When the adrenal hormones are so low they leave the joints, ligaments and connective tissues undernourished.  This leaves our musculo-skeletal structure weak and unstable and leaves us susceptible to injury.

Typically, when we put a demand on a joint the body responds by getting stronger to resist that demand. When somebody has an adrenal issue, there is an opposite effect. This is a major reason why people injure themselves when they’re under stress.

The major muscles known to be involved when adrenal fatigue has set its claim are:

 1) sartorius, 2) gracilis, 3) posterior tibialis, 4) gastrocnemius, and 5) soleus. There will be weakness in one or more of these muscles when the adrenal glands are malfunctioning.

These are your hamstrings, adductors & calves

The attachments of the sartorius and gracilis on the pelvis can cause pelvic instability and other muscular imbalances through out the body, causing pain and injury.

I have personally experienced this and have lost not only valued training time and increasing doctor’s bills but my health and well being.

Even if you are not an athlete, if you see 3 or more of these symptoms…listen up !

COMMON SYMPTOMS

Difficulty getting up in the morning
Continuing Fatigue even after a good night’s sleep
Craving salt or salty foods
Lethargy
Lack of energy
Daily tasks feel like a chore and require increased effort
Decreased sex drive
Decreased ability to handle stress
Compulsive eating, smoking or drug use
Increased time to recover from illness, injury or trauma
Light-headed when standing up quickly
Mild depression
Lack of interest in anything
PMS symptoms increase
Lack of focus or fuzzy thoughts
Absentmindedness
Decreased productivity

The problem is Adrenal fatigue does not show up in standard blood tests.  These tests will look for the most extreme low end Hypoadrenia or Addison’s disease anything less than that is considered  Adrenal fatigue and dismissed in general medicine as NORMAL.

This is NOT NORMAL.
When the adrenals fatigue, cortisol levels drop. This creates inflammatory responses throughout the body. Cortisol is the most powerful anti-inflammatory in the body and without it the body can’t fight back.

This is NOT HEALTHY.
Saliva testing and muscle testing are two more accurate ways to test for adrenal disfunction.

Investing in self-care is your only defense.  More on this next blog…

GO for Life! ™

In peace, health & with much love,

Joycelyn Bejar
Certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer